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DON’T BET YOUR LIFE

December 10th, 2013

With the proliferation of gambling casinos, Internet gambling sites, state lotteries,and other gambling venues that make it easier to make bets, it’s no wonder that the number of Americans with gambling addictions can be counted in the millions (an estimated 2%-5% of the population). Seemingly, no one is spared from this impulse-control problem. While men tend to develop gambling problems earlier (during teenage years) and more often than women, numbers of females with gambling addictions are fast catching up with males. Moreover, the disorder tends to get worse much faster among women than men. Those of either gender with a gambling addiction may engage in binge gambling and/or persistent gambling behavior, as well as have persistent thoughts about gambling.

Of course, if you or a loved one is wrestling with any sort of addiction, regardless of gender, you should get help now. But we know that you needn’t be suffering from something as dramatic as a gambling addiction to deserve help. You may be dealing with something more quiet, like depression, anxiety, or grief. Our compassionate counselors can provide you with the proven techniques and safe space that you need to be healthy again. If you would like an appointment

Please contact one of our offices in Le Mars and Orange City, 800-325-1192, or 712-546-4624; Cherokee, 712-225-2575; Ida Grove, 712-364-3500, Storm Lake, 712-213-8402, or Carroll, 712-792-2991.

P.S. Unless they seek treatment, pathological gamblers often risk important relationships, employment, and other opportunities that can put them on a path to losing nearly all they hold dear and important in their lives.

MEN’S WAY OF DEALING

December 10th, 2013

Depression is more common among women than men, but men’s depression is more difficult for the untrained eye to detect. For instance, we might expect symptoms of depression to include lack of motivation, sadness, and fatigue, which is largely true. However, about half of depressed men tend not to display these classic symptoms. Instead, they might throw themselves into work, exercise, sex, alcohol, and such high-risk activities as gambling. These symptoms are not only generally unrecognized as being associated with depression, but they also seem to be counterintuitive. That, in fact, may
be the point: many depressed men become hyperactive to mask their feelings from themselves and others. Recognizing these symptoms is the first step to effectively treating depression.

No matter your gender or your symptoms, if you are dealing with depression, you deserve help. At our office, we understand and we are here to help you. Our experienced counselors can provide proven techniques that you need to be able to deal with your depression and be able to live a happier, healthier life, in a comfortable, safe environment. In addition to help with depression, we can also help you with fear, anxiety, grief, or stress. If you would like an appointment or if you have any questions, please

Please contact one of our offices in Le Mars and Orange City, 800-325-1192, or 712-546-4624; Cherokee, 712-225-2575; Ida Grove, 712-364-3500, Storm Lake, 712-213-8402, or Carroll, 712-792-2991.

P.S. When men’s untreated depressive symptom of overzealous behavior combines with aggression and anger, it may prove to be highly corrosive to a marriage and other relationships.

CANCER DIAGNOSIS INCREASES SUICIDE RISK

December 10th, 2013

Patients presented with cancer diagnoses are likely to experience fairly immediate reactions, both physical and psychological. On the one hand, a cancer diagnosis has been found to increase the likelihood of dying from a cardiovascular cause (heart attack); on the other, being diagnosed with cancer is associated with an increased risk of committing suicide. The risk of suicide begins in the first week of a cancer diagnosis and persists up to one year and beyond, while the risk of cardiovascular death lasts about six months for those with cancer diagnoses. This information should lead to an increased awareness of the possibility of both outcomes and preventive treatment for each. These associations are no longer thought to be consequences of treatment.

A cancer diagnosis and suicidal thoughts are both urgent reasons to call our office right away. Our compassionate counselors can help you through this crisis in your life by providing proven techniques and a safe space. You deserve help during this difficult time in your life. In addition to help with depression, we can also help you with fear, anxiety, grief, or stress. If you would like an appointment or if you have any questions, please

Please contact one of our offices in Le Mars and Orange City, 800-325-1192, or 712-546-4624; Cherokee, 712-225-2575; Ida Grove, 712-364-3500, Storm Lake, 712-213-8402, or Carroll, 712-792-2991.

P.S. A cancer diagnosis is a major stress factor in that some patients view it as a virtual
“death sentence,” which may no longer necessarily be the case.

DEALING WITH INSOMNIA

December 10th, 2013

If getting to sleep is a problem, a method known as “cognitive refocusing treatment” may help empty the mind of worrisome thoughts that might be blocking slumber. Much like counting sheep, the technique involves performing personally engaging yet non-stimulating mental tasks (such as reciting lyrics) when falling asleep or waking up at night. This method tends to work better than counting sheep because it
involves the mind in personal thoughts that are easier to focus on than unfamiliar and arbitrary sheep. The technique is a type of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), which involves changing behavior by altering the way a person thinks. Research shows that it is more effective in the long-term than sleeping pills.

Insomnia can be a debilitating problem, affecting every aspect of your life. If you are wrestling with this and would like to know more about cognitive refocusing behavior, please call our office. Our compassionate counselors understand how devastating insomnia is. We will work with you to both mitigate the effects with proven techniques and to get to the root cause of the problem. In addition to help with insomnia, we can provide relief for those dealing with anxiety, grief, or depression.

Please contact one of our offices in Le Mars and Orange City, 800-325-1192, or 712-546-4624; Cherokee, 712-225-2575; Ida Grove, 712-364-3500, Storm Lake, 712-213-8402, or Carroll, 712-792-2991.

P.S. Insomniacs may want to explore with a therapist the problems and issues that are keeping them up at night.

FEELING ANXIOUS?

December 10th, 2013

Anxiety disorders are the most frequently occurring mental health problems among the general population. While anxiety is a natural reaction to stress, it can become excessive to the point of disrupting a person’s life. If so, behavioral therapy may be an effective form of treatment. It is based on the belief that, by changing their approach to a given situation, patients can begin effecting a change in how they react to it. This approach involves progressively introducing patients to situations that provoke anxiety in an effort to have them tackle their fears progressively. As patients learn to control their anxiety, they gain self-confidence and achieve mastery over their situations. In this way, many phobic patients experience long-term recovery.

If anxiety is affecting your life, it’s time that you called our office. We understand the pervasive nature of an anxiety disorder and our compassionate counselors will work with you to help you be healthy again. We provide a safe and comforting space for you to recover and proven techniques that will help you get better. In addition to anxiety, we can provide relief for depression and stress. You deserve the help. If you would like an appointment or if you have any questions, please

Please contact one of our offices in Le Mars and Orange City, 800-325-1192, or 712-546-4624; Cherokee, 712-225-2575; Ida Grove, 712-364-3500, Storm Lake, 712-213-8402, or Carroll, 712-792-2991.

P.S. Recent surveys suggest that as many as one in five Americans experience anxiety disorders.